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Michael Eidson, 16 Oct '12

Wearing a long cloak in hot weather wasn't always a sign you're concealing something or intend to, thought the elder Cornraind as he watched the younger Nachford walking amongst the carts and stalls in the marketplace. Cornraind had seen Nachford around here before, knew the man to have only half a brain and no couth. The older man had not seen the younger one take anything from a cart that he hadn't put back, but Cornraind was still suspicious. Not that it was his duty to patrol the marketplace, but even in retirement he had the mindset of a City Guard.

Cornraind stayed his distance, but maneuvered his way through the stalls to keep Nachford in sight. Something didn't look right about the young man. Cornraind couldn't put his finger on it; maybe Nachford had put on some weight, or grown an inch taller. Maybe he had already stolen something and carried it under his cloak. But it wouldn't do for Cornraind to confront the young man; any ensuing incident would have bad consequences for Cornraind even if Nachford were concealing stolen goods. The City Guard would lock away anyone for the night, even a former City Guard, who caused a disturbance in their fair city without due cause.

Shrill laughter cut over the noise of the crowd. Nachford had apparently just told one of his strange stories to Pwervara, an older woman selling apples. She held out an apple to Nachford, and the man placed both hands on it, one on either side. He bowed to the stall owner and kissed her wrinkled hand as she released the apple.

At the same time, a hand covered with mottled gray skin snaked out of a pocket of Nachford's cloak, grabbed another piece of fruit from the apple cart, and hauled it into the pocket. As Cornraind hurried closer, he could hear munching from Nachford's direction. When he stood right behind Nachford, he heard a belch and saw an apple core thrown at high velocity out of the pocket.

Cornraind had just witnessed what was obviously a theft of an apple, and he clapped a hand on Nachford's shoulder.

The young man turned around with an inquisitive look, holding the apple Pwervara had handed him. "Yes?"

"Excuse me, young Nachford, but your stowaway stole an apple from this nice lady."

"Stowaway?"

"The gremlin in your pocket."

"Gremlin?"

"In your pocket."

Nachford reached into his pocket and turned it inside out. It was clearly empty.

"I know what I saw." But doubt gnawed at Cornraind's gut. Had he been wrong? Was his sight playing tricks on him? He looked for the discarded apple core, but didn't see it anywhere.

"I think you need some herbs and prayers, old man. You're either seeing things or you're possessed."

Pwervara shooed him away with her hands. "Nachford was just about to buy an apple, and I don't need you ruining a sale for me. Or should I call the real City Guard and have them carry you away? Guard! Guard!"

"I'm sorry," muttered Cornraind, and he trudged away, his conscience weighing heavy in his chest. He'd been so sure of what he saw.

As he passed another apple cart, one belonging to Raugal, a man about Cornraind's age but too poor to retire, the mottled gray hand reached out of one of the lower pockets of Cornraind's cloak and snatched an apple. He heard munching and crunching, and then the apple core went flying. "Why you little..." he shouted, and dove a hand into his pocket. His hand met no resistance other than the cloth of the interior of his pocket. He turned the pocket inside out, and it was empty.

"Can I help you?" Raugal stepped around the cart and looked askance at Cornraind.

"I saw it again," mumbled Cornraind. "It stole an apple from your cart."

Just then a hand reached out of one of Raugal's pockets and grabbed another apple. Cornraind moved quickly. If he could catch it while it was eating, maybe it wouldn't have a chance to get away.

"Get off!" Raugal shouted, striking Cornraind over the head and shoulders as the retired City Guard bent over and stuffed a hand into Raugal's pocket.

Cornraind clutched something hard and clunky and drew it out of Raugal's pocket. Coins fell from his clenched fist.

"Thief!" shouted Raugal.

Cornraind dropped the coins and ran. He managed five quick strides before he collided with a cart loaded with fish. He and the fish and the fishmonger landed on the ground in a tangled, smelly mess.

A stern voice boomed over him; it belonged to City Guardsman Gavaeld. "What is going on here?"

"The old coot tried to steal from me," said Raugal.

"He's ruined all my fish," said the fishmonger.

"He interrupted my making a sale," said Pwervara.

"He accused me of stealing," said Nachford.

"Come on, old man," said Gavaeld, hauling Cornraind to his feet. "Of all people, you should know better than this."

"But I--"

"Save it. You can sleep it off in a cell tonight, and Chief will decide your fate in the morning."

Cornraind knew better than to argue. If he were still with the City Guard, he'd have done no differently than Gavaeld, given the same circumstances. He went along, keeping his mouth shut, and stood there looking forlornly through the bars of a cell with no furnishings except a small straw cot against the back wall. Gavaeld turned the key in the lock to the cell door, wagging his head in pity but not speaking one word of comfort to his prisoner. Cornraind knew he wouldn't receive even a morsel of food until morning; it was part of his punishment.

As Gavaeld turned to walk away, a hand zipped out of his pocket and threw an apple through the bars. The fruit landed at Cornraind's feet. The retired City Guard picked it up, rubbed it on his cloak, sat on the edge of the straw cot, and quietly yet gratefully ate his meager dinner. He even ate the core, eliminating any evidence that he'd somehow avoided a part of his expected punishment.

Comments · 2

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  • Michael Eidson said...

    This was fun to write. I had no idea where it was going until I'd written that Nachford's pocket was empty when he turned it out. I'd originally thought that Nachford was deliberately hiding something or someone. When his pocket turned out empty, I had a better idea where the story was going, but still didn't know exactly how it would end. That's what I like about writing these bursts the way I do; I enjoy the unfolding and resolution of a story without knowing the outcome ahead of time. But it's difficult for me to write a coherent novel that way.

    Taking a little time away from working on my novel to write a burst keeps me from getting into a creative rut. I can go back to my novel with a new perspective that will help bring out other facets of my novel that I might not have thought of if I kept my brain focused on the novel's plot and characters.

    Once again, I used the generators on my web site at http://eposic.org/ to come up with the initial ideas for this story. I used the name generator at http://trollhalla.com/outer-sanctum/2012/10/05/tunnels-and-trolls-name-generator/ for all of the character names in this burst.

    • Posted 5 years ago
  • Anthony Blackshaw said...

    Hi Michael, this was excellent. I don't know if your aware but we're running a narrated tales competition at the moment (you can find the details on the blog - http://blog.burrst.com/post/32593705446/announcing-the-narrated-tales-competition). It would be great to hear a narrated version of this *cough* (hint)

    • Posted 5 years ago